50th anniversary of Apollo 11 space mission

Google Doodle imprints 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 space mission: The Doodle video is in the vocal of Command Module Pilot (CMP) Michael Collins who left behind aboard the command module in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin grew to become the first human beings to step foot on the Moon.

On July 20, 1969, American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin has become the first human beings ever to land on the Moon aboard the Apollo 11 mission – an extraordinary feat of mankind celebrated by Google with a Doodle video clip on Friday.

The Doodle video is in the vocal of Command Module Pilot (CMP) Michael Collins who stayed aboard the command module in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin became the first human beings to step foot on the Moon.

As he started to take his first step, Armstrong notoriously exclaimed, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

The Apollo 11 mission eventuated 8 years after President John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) announced a national goal of landing a man on the moon towards the end of the 1960s.

Apollo 17, the final manned moon mission, happened in 1972.

Around 1 million people accumulated on the seashores of central Florida to experience first-hand the launch of Apollo 11, when around 500 million people world-wide watched the event live on television set, NASA claimed in an announcement.

The two astronauts spent more than 21 hours on the lunar surface area deploying scientific experiments and collecting samples before getting back to the orbiting command module, piloted by Collins.

In a series of special occasions, NASA is grading the 50th anniversary of the Apollo program – the historic effort that shipped the first US astronauts into orbit around the Moon in 1968, and landed 12 astronauts on the lunar surface between 1969 and 1972.

For the very first time in half a century, NASA’s “Artemis” missions will permit scientists and engineers to take a look at the lunar surface from up close.

“This will teach us how to move safely across lunar soil, known as regolith; how to build infrastructure on top of it; and how to keep humans safe in space. The techniques scientists will develop on the Moon will make it possible for humans to safely and sustainably explore farther destinations, such as Mars,” asserted NASA.

NASA in their official twitter page shared few special pictures related to Apollo 11 and one of the best is;

Share this to your,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *